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Mama Bear Domain Group

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Groin Sorokin
Groin Sorokin

NJ TRANSIT TRAIN



Senior Citizens (62 and older) and customers with disabilities can travel on NJ TRANSIT trains, buses, and light rail vehicles at a reduced fare of half the regular one-way fare or less at all times. Learn more.




NJ TRANSIT TRAIN



A flat fee of $3.00 will be charged on-board trains when you present a ticket/pass printed with Hoboken Terminal for travel to/from New York or points in New Jersey ($4.25 from Denville through Hackettstown stations). For travel to/from stations on the Main, Bergen County, Pascack Valley or Port Jervis lines, refer to your line's timetable for the proper change-in-terminal fee.


You can purchase tickets aboard the train without penalty only if there is no ticket agent or ticket vending machine available (A $5 surcharge is applied to tickets purchased aboard trains if a ticket agent or ticket vending machine is available at time of boarding). Customers with disabilities and senior citizens (62 or older) may purchase tickets aboard any train without penalty. Conductors cannot accept bills larger than $20.


Some trains on the Northeast Corridor and North Jersey Coast Line lines stop at Newark Liberty International Airport Station. Look for an airplane icon or "EWR" on the departure boards. Not all trains on these lines stop at the airport, so double-check.


Fare for the PATH train is $2.75. You can pay using a pay-per-ride MetroCard (except EasyPay) or a PATH SmartLink card. Fare for the 62 bus is $1.60. You can buy a ticket at a vending machine in Newark Penn Station, or pay exact change onboard.


Need to catch a bus or train but you don't have a current schedule? Don't worry. Choose the transit system you need below and you'll get the arrival and departure times, fares and other general information.


On weekdays, catch the train from either the Montclair Heights station on Normal Ave. or the Montclair State University station on Clove Rd. Board on the eastbound (towards Newark/New York/Hoboken) platform to reach the following stations:


On weekdays, catch the train from the Montclair Heights station on Normal Ave. or the Montclair State University train station on Clove Rd. These trains go directly to NYC and Hoboken, with stops at Newark Broad Street and Secaucus.


To get to Philadelphia, on weekdays, take the train to Secaucus and transfer to the Northeast Corridor Line (NEC) towards Trenton. In Trenton, you can switch to SEPTA which will take you into Center City Philadelphia.


There is no weekend train service at Montclair State University or Montclair Heights, however, on Saturdays, you can take the Montclair State Bay Street Shuttle to the Bay Street Train station in downtown Montclair and take the train to Hoboken or New York from there.


To get to Philadelphia, on weekdays, take the 28 bus to Newark Penn Station and transfer to the Northeast Corridor Line (NEC) towards Trenton. In Trenton, you can switch to SEPTA which will take you into Center City Philadelphia. Alternately, in Newark Penn Station, you can take an Amtrak train to Philadelphia. (You cannot use your NJ Transit train ticket on Amtrak trains, or vice versa.)


Trains from the Montclair Heights station on Normal Ave. and the Montclair State University train station on Clove Rd. head east into NYC and Hoboken, with stops at Newark Broad Street and Secaucus where connections to other services can be made; and west towards Hackettstown. Check the NJ Transit train schedule. There is no weekend train service at Montclair State University or Montclair Heights.


Newark Liberty Airport (EWR) can be accessed via bus and/or train. On weekdays, take the train from campus to Secaucus and transfer to the NEC train with EWR listed. On weekends, take the 28 bus to Newark Penn Station then transfer to a train line with EWR listed.


Myers said he has fought NJ Transit and other agencies on behalf of injured train workers since the early 1990s. Violence by passengers attacking train crews has been an ongoing problem that agencies exacerbate by failing to have adequate security staffing and protocols in place, especially during peak travel times, Myers said.


Agency officials were well aware of increasing abuse against train crews because they supported legislation that Gov. Phil Murphy signed in January to toughen penalties against abusive passengers, said Robert Myers, the Bala Cynwyd, Pa.-based attorney who filed the lawsuit.


The complaint accuses the agency of failing to put enough security staff on trains and at stations and platforms; train staff in self-defense and equip them with defensive tools like pepper spray and stun guns; prevent overcrowding on trains and platforms and provide safe spaces on both for staff to escape dangerous passengers; and install and monitor security cameras and communications systems on trains and stations.


The new law Murphy signed in January also allows NJ Transit to suspend or ban public transit riders who assault employees and requires the agency to install communications systems in all trains and buses to ensure employees can connect quickly with law enforcement in emergencies.


AmtrakAmtrak provides limited direct service to New Brunswick, however, connections can easily be made via New Jersey Transit trains to principal Amtrak stations at MetroPark, New York, and Trenton.


Local train stations that provide access to both cities through NJTransit. There are stations in Somerville and Raritan, which provide access to the Raritan Valley Line. There are also stations in New Brunswick and Princeton Junction that provide access to the Northeast Corridor. New Brunswick is an express train stop. Information for these stations is available on


RideWise engages with large and small employers, local government, state agencies, school districts, and other non-profits to advocate for travel options that are good for business, good for the environment, and good for communities. RideWise achieves this through programming that focuses on pedestrian safety, public transit, biking and ridesharing.


The National Transportation Safety Board, which is investigating Thursday's crash of NJ Transit Pascack Valley Line train No. 1614 into the platform of the Hoboken Terminal, said in a statement today that no determination has been reached on what caused the crash.


NTSB investigators have spoken to the train's engineer, Thomas Gallagher, 48, who was injured in the crash, but said no summary of what was said would be released until all interviews are completed. According to a law enforcement official, preliminary tests indicate he was likely not under the influence of drugs or alcohol at the time of the accident.


According to an NTSB statement released today, there were no signal anomalies found on the tracks leading to the terminal, but because the train that crashed is still in the terminal, a full study of the signals has not been completed.


Video from other trains in the station at the time of the crash is being reviewed to determine whether there is anything of value to the investigation, but video from the train that crashed is still not accessible, according to the NTSB.


Eric Boehlert, 57, was riding a bicycle near the Watchung Avenue station in Montclair, NJ, at around 9:50 p.m. when he was struck and killed by a Hoboken-bound NJ Transit train, according to NorthJersey.com.


The Hudson Tunnel Project proposes to rehabilitate the existing tunnel under the Hudson River that carries Amtrak and NJ TRANSIT Northeast Corridor passenger trains between New Jersey and New York, and construct a new tunnel and associated railroad infrastructure to carry passenger rail trains while the existing tunnel is being rehabilitated. 041b061a72


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